Its no longer news that spammers keep devising ways to scam people out of their hard earned money, and sending fraudulent mails to get you to click on a link that takes you to a cloned website, send confidential information or hack into your email account is one of them.

Lookout for the tips before to help you identify a spam email that is definitely not from your bank.

  • Check the senders’ address, if it does not match the one belonging to your bank, then beware and don’t ever reply or click any link in such a mail. For example, a mail from United Bank for Africa should read like this (sendername@UBAGroup.com)
For example, a mail from United Bank for Africa should read like this (sendername@UBAGroup.com)
For example, a mail from United Bank for Africa should read like this (sendername@UBAGroup.com)
  • Check any link in the sender mail, if it’s not taking you to UBAGroup.com or any of its subdomains, then beware. Spammy links usually have funny characters or letters that includes the real website address, don’t be received!
What a spammy link usually looks like
What a spammy link usually looks like
  • Spammers at times cunningly ask for your personal information, like your date of birth or BVN number, don’t ever reply to any mail to give that information. Or click any link to any website to give that information. Better safe than sorry.
  • When a mail from your ‘supposed bank’ requires you to carry out an urgent activity such as ‘making a transfer to avoid your account been blocked’ or some very weird reason, don’t do it, most of our banks have dedicated numbers available for 24hrs, call your bank to confirm or if you have the tiniest doubt.

That being said, your bank would never request for personal information via email, please stay alert. Got questions or feedback? Please comment below.

P.S – This write up was curated from content written by UBAGroup, hence why we used UBA in our examples. Your bank website address would be different.